WHAT ARE THE PHYSICS BEHIND HOW A ROLLER COASTER WORKS
The roller coaster was an invention made for people to ride. This invention demonstrates many laws of motion. Gravity powers it, and this ride is mostly working because of gravity. When you get to the top of your first hill gravity pulls you down this will create kinetic energy. The speed of the ride depends on the height on the hill. When going up the hill you may feel slightly heavier this is because of the amount of inertia getting added to the Gs, the amount of Gs will be 3 to 4. While going down it will be the Inertia subtracted by all the current Gs with this you will get 0 or even negative Gs which will make you feel almost weight less.

ZSC roller coaster.jpg
Figure 1: This picture represents the physics of kinetic and potential energy and inertia in roller coaster rides.




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Figure 2: This is a less or more complex drawing of the drawing above for some people this is more complex for others it is less complex




Roller coasters past and present

In the late 20th century the use of electromagnetic waves to propel the roller coaster into launch, destroying the need for chain-driven lift hills and gravity drops.
In the 19th century the prototype for roller coasters in the U.S. had mules help driving the thrill ride. Passengers paid 50c per ride. When people did not ride the coaster they had used the coaster to carry the coal back from mines. This was before people realized it could be a ride.


Glossary
Gravity: the force that keeps you on the ground
Inertia: the shows that when in motion you want to stay in motion (this works best in space)
Gs: The things that make you feel weight
Past: the time that has already happened
Present: What is happing now.
Mule: a breed of donkey and horse
Prototype: Not yet finished invention in other words invention that is still in proses

Citations
Grolier Educational Staff. Popular science. Roller coasters. Grolier, 2002. Print. 13

sept. 2012.

How stuff works. Roller coaster physics. How stuff works inc., 2012. Web. 24 sept.

2012.

"Missouri." Compton's by Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.




"roller coaster." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School

Edition.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 12 Sept. 2012

“roller coaster.” Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 13 Sept. 2012.

"roller coaster." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School

Edition.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 14 Sept. 2012.

"roller coaster." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School

Edition.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 12 Sept. 2012.