Newton’s First law of motion

Casey S. 2012

NEWTON’S FIRST LAW OF MOTION:
“Every body continues in its state of rest, or of uniform motion in a straight line, unless it is compelled to change that state by forces impressed upon it.” FOR EXAMPLE: If you have a still ball, it will stay still, but if you have another force act upon like another ball the still ball will start moving. If you have a rolling ball, it will keep rolling. But if you have another force that acts upon it like a wall the ball will slow down and stop after hitting the wall. How much friction you have also matters. FOR EXAMPLE: If you roll a puck on ice it will go farther than if you roll a puck on carpet. Why? This is because the ice and the puck have less friction together than the puck and the carpet. The less friction there is the father the puck will go. Also there is Newotn's second law of motion and his third law of motion.


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Figure 1: Example of Newton's First Law of Motion
FRICTION:

Friction plays a major part in Newton’s first law of motion because friction is a big example of one of those forces. FOR EXAMPLE: If you have a rolling ball. You’re rolling it on the carpet, and there are no walls around to stop it. You roll the ball and it stops after 20 feet. remember there was no wall that stopped it.

You’re confused. What force stopped the ball? The answer is friction. Friction is something you can’t see but you can feel. If you rub your hands together your hands become hot and that is friction. The same thing is happening with the ball and carpet. The friction between the ball and carpet is why the ball stopped. Friction is a big factor in everything. It factors in sports like curling. The slower you roll a ball the faster it will stop and the faster you roll a ball the slower it will stop. As you can see friction has a major factor in Newton’s first law.



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Figure 2 opposing forces
INERTIA:
Newton's first law of motion describes inertia. Inertia is short for Newton’s first law. Inertia was formulated by Galileo Galilei. Inertia is the properties that will make all
matter oppose any force that could potentially cause a change in its motion. Inertia of a body can be measured by its mass.



MASS:
Mass is an intrinsic property of that body that never changes. Someone’s mass stays the same if there on earth or the moon. The internal mass of an object determines its acceleration in the presence of an applied force.

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Figure 3 Isaac Newton
ISAAC NEWTON BACKGROUND:
Isaac Newton was born in Woolsthorpe, England on December 25th, 1642. Isaac Newton never knew his father. Isaac Newton went to a trinity college in Cambridge in 1661. He was the figure of the scientific revolution of the 17th century he was a physicist and a mathematician. He laid down the foundations of calculus and he also expanded what we knew about color and light.

NEWTON’S CRADLE:
Newton’s Cradle is the best example of Newton’s first law of motion. The way it works is that you pull back the ball, and let it go. That ball slams into the other balls and forces the last ball or the ball farthest away from the first ball to swing. When the first ball is released it hits the second and distributes its power to the second ball. The 2nd does it to the 3rd, then the 3rd to the 4th and 4th to 5th. The 5th ball distributes its momentum to the 6th, but the 6th ball doesn't have a ball to distribute its momentum too, so it goes up into the air and comes back down and hits the 5th ball which becomes a cycle.
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Figure 4 Newton's Cradle








GLOSSARY:
Friction: surface resistance to motion.
Galileo Galilei: Italian physicist and astronomer.
Inertia: a property that makes all matter oppose any force that could potentially cause a change in its motion
Mass: is an intrinsic property of that body that never changes.

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Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 13 Sept. 2012.

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