What is Sir Isaac Newton’s third law of motion?
By: Leo D.
2011
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Sir Isaac Newton in his young years
Sir Isaac Newton
First off, who is Sir Isaac Newton? Sir Isaac Newton was a physicist and mathematician born on December 25, 1642. His father and Mother died not long after he was born, so he was raised by his Grandmother. Newton went to college at Cambridge University, and was interested at what European Scientists were doing. That was his first impression of Physics. Before Newton did any big experiments, he was a professor at Cambridge University. He worked here from 1669 to 1701. Sir Isaac Newton’s first big experiment was about light. He concluded that light is a mixture of all colors. Newton also “founded” gravity, when an apple fell on his head. For this project, we are going to talk about the three laws that Newton made.
Sir Isaac Newton created three laws of motion. He did this with his assistant, Dr. Humphrey Newton. The laws of motion apply to any moving object. All three laws work together, but we are going to be looking at the third law, which states ‘for each action, there is an equal or opposite reaction’. This means, an object or thing will move or change in a way, from other forces acting on it. These examples might help your understanding…
Leod169Science_diagram_for_newton_project.jpg
These are normal balls with a description of what is happening here


Step 1: The small ball is moving towards the big ball
Step 2: The action, or collision, happens when the small ball hits the big ball
Step 3: The small ball stops and the big ball starts moving. The small ball released its energy into the big ball.
Other Examples:
  1. A small book on the table will fall slower than a big book, because of gravity, and the sound, or the reaction will be louder for the big book. This is because the weight of the book deforms the table a bit, and the table springs back (reaction), barely shooting the book into the air, making a sound. The more mass the book has, the bigger the sound, and the bigger the reaction.
  2. When a rocket is launched into the air, the fuel stored inside it is propelled backwards. This is so hot gas is released into the rocket, (not the part where people are,) and since gas rises, the rocket is launched into the sky.
  3. Bumper cars are also a great example; when a bumper car hits another bumper car, one bounces off the other one. This is the reaction.
  4. In pool, when the cue ball is struck by the stick, it hits another ball, possibly the one you’re trying to get in a pocket. The action is when the cue ball hits the other ball, and the reaction is when the ball goes in the opposite direction it was hit from.
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Here are everyday bumpercars at the fair or fun place
This law is also known as the action and reaction law, or the interaction law. In 1543, Nicolaus Copernicus suggested that the sun was in the center of the universe. Newton’s laws of motion denied that suggestion, and all of a sudden, people made him famous. Sir Isaac Newton died in London on March 20, 1727.
Glossary:
Physics- the science of matter, force, motion, and energy
Deforms- to put something out of its normal shape
Gravity- the force that acts on every object or thing. Gravity is stronger or weaker depending on how much mass the object has. The bigger the mass, the stronger the gravity is on it.
Stationary- Not moving.

Citations
  1. Greenberger, Robert. How Do We Know the Nature of Energy. New York, New York, Rosen, 2005. Print.
  2. Motion." Britannica Elementary Encyclopedia. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.
    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2011. Web. 13 Sept. 2011.
  3. "Newton, Isaac." Compton's by Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2011. Web. 13 Sept. 2011.
  4. "Newton, Isaac." Compton's by Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2011. Web. 13 Sept. 2011.
  5. "Newton, Isaac." Compton's by Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.
    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2011. Web. 13 Sept. 2011.
    <http://school.eb.com/all/comptons/article-9276067>.
  6. Newton's laws of motion." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.
    Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2011. Web. 13 Sept. 2011.
    <http://school.eb.com/eb/article-9055622>.