IS IT POSSIBLE TO SKEWER A BALLOON WITH A STICK IF SO, HOW DOES IT WORK
Can you skewer a balloon with a stick? The answer is yes. The secret is, balloons are made of rubber so when you pierce through the part where the balloon is stretched rubber will rip and cause the balloon to pop. You look where the rubber molecules are under the least amount of stress or strain and that is where you insert the sharp object. When you blow up the balloon, not all parts of the balloon are stretched. The best place to insert the sharp object is where you tie the knot, and then to poke the sharp object directly opposite of where you tied the knot.

jmj_hand drawn picture of a balloon and polymer strands.jpg
Figure 1 This is a picture of polymer strands in the balloon. Air coming out of the holes in the balloon.

jmj picture of a balloon that was  been skewerd.jpg
Figure 2 This is a picture of a balloon that has been skewered.

Latex balloons
Latex balloons are made of natural latex they get the latex from rubber trees. Latex balloons can be filled with water helium water or gas or liquid. Balloons are made of elastic so you can fill a balloon with the air from your mouth or an electric inflator. When you blow up an up a balloon you are filling up a balloon with helium so that they float. When the balloons are enclosed air escapes through the very small pores in the latex. Balloons that are filled with air keep their same size and shape usually up to a week. Even the best balloons still loses air to the gases that are outside
.
Skewering- To hold together or pierce with or as if with a skewer.
Latex- An emulsion of rubber or plastic globules in water, used in paints, adhesives, and various synthetic rubber products
Polymer- Any of numerous natural and synthetic compounds of usually high molecular weight consisting of up to millions of repeated linked units, each a relatively light and simple molecule.

Citations
Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. “Balloon.” //http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balloon//. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Unknown. Web. 27 Sept. 2012.
Brown, Theodore L. Mar. 2009. Web. 2009, 27 Sept. 2012.latex." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.Chemistry: The Central Science. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1994. Print.
Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 28 Sept. 2012.

<http://school.eb.com/eb/article-9047283>.
The Free Dictionary. “Latex.” http://www.thefreedictionary.com/skewer. Unknown. Web. Sept 28. 2012.
The Free Dictionary. “Skewer.” http://www.thefreedictionary.com/skewer. Unknown.
Web. Sep The Free Dictionary. “Polymer.” http://www.thefreedictionary.com/skewer. Unknown. Web. Sept 28. 2012.
28. 2012.
Mar. 2009. Web. 2009, 27 Sept. 2012.latex." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.
Spangler, Steve. Fire Bubbles and Exploding Toothpaste. Austin, Texas: Greenleaf Book Group Press, 2012. Print.
Skewer.” http://www.thefreedictionary.com/skewer. Unknown. Web. Sept 28. 2012.