HOW DO HELIUM BALLOONS WORK
Helium balloons work by the law of buoyancy. . The inside of the balloon has the hot and cold air in it. In the helium balloon there is hot and cold air are pushing down as well as the weight but the buoyancy over powers it. Helium has a lifting force it is 1 gram per liter. Helium is a chemical element. Helium is tasteless, colorless and you cannot see it. Helium is lighter than air so you can imagine why we cannot feel it. Helium ways about 0.1785.



KAS how do helium balloons work  drawn picture.jpg





KAS how do helium balloons work.jpg










HOW MANY BALOONS DOES IT TAKE TO LIFT A PERSON
As I said in my paragraph above we know that helium has lifting force of one gram per liter. If you had a balloon that had five liters of helium the balloon can lift five grams. A normal balloon that you can get at Harris Teeter might be about one foot in diameter. If you weighed 50 kilometers then you would way 50,000 grams and 110 pounds. If you divide 14 grams per balloon and you find that you will need 3,5711.42 balloons to lift your weight it is right. You are suggested to add 500 more so you would fly up at a good pace. It is something that we do not recommend trying though.

Glossary
Helium-works by using the same law of buoyancy
Physics-an upward force
Partial-small object

Citations
"helium." Britannica Elementary Encyclopedia. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.

Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 28 Sept. 2012.
"balloon and airship." Compton's by Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.

Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 28 Sept. 2012.

Brain, MarshallNew York : Hungry Minds, c2001Marshall Brain's how stuff works
http://www.wahlsupply.com/coolray/how.php
"helium." Britannica Elementary Encyclopedia. Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition.

Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 28 Sept. 2012.

Neer, Katherine. "How many regular-sized helium-filled balloons would it take to lift someone?" 01 April 2000. HowStuffWorks.com. <http://science.howstuffworks.com/science-vs-myth/everyday-myths/question185.htm> 28 September 2012.